Livity Life Care Blog

7 Tips for Surviving Nursing School Stress

Tawana Johnson - Friday, July 22, 2016

 

 

Surviving Nursing School Stress

1. Practice an after-class-recap

“No matter how many times faculty tell students NOT to do marathon study sessions- they simply do not listen,” says nurse educator Marilyn Stoner, RN-BC, PhD. She believes consistent, short periods of study beats cramming any day.

“Cramming for exams creates more stress,” says Michelle Katz, LPN, MSN. “To avoid getting stressed, I would review my notes right after class and a little every day.”

Find an interim time after class to get in the habit of a quick review. Pull your notes out for a few minutes on the bus, waiting in line at the grocery store or even on a bench outside your classroom. Katz cut cramming from her routine this way and was able to get a good night’s sleep instead.

2. Find a solid study group

“One of the things that kept me sane during nursing school was my study group,” says RN and nurse recruiter Ashleigh Taylor of Tailored Healthcare. Taylor met with a study group every week to compare notes, demonstrate skills and practice NCLEX-style questions. This routine of reviewing and studying kept the information fresh.

“Studying with a group was the only way to keep me on track, and it was fun,” Taylor says. “I actually looked forward to getting together every week!” She advocates the importance of having other students to lean on through nursing school.

“It’s a crazy time in your life when you laugh, cry, scream and cry some more,” she adds. “You find out what you’re made of. I met some of my best friends in nursing school!”

3. Mix exercise into your study sessions

When you feel your stress levels spiking, get moving! While exercise has long been proven to help relieve stress and anxiety, it also boosts your ability to retain the information you’re studying. Harvard Medical School credits regular exercise for the memory-enhancing release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

Katz picked up on these perks early on. She and her friends used to take study breaks to discuss notes for their exams while walking or jogging. If time or space limitations make running or walking problematic, Katz also suggests jumping rope.

4. Begin a study session with simple meditation

Devoting some time and deliberation to the little things can pay dividends. Nursing students find a lot of solidarity in the collective stress they feel, and taking steps to abate that stress together will only increase camaraderie.

Stoner suggests beginning study sessions, whether alone or in a group, with a simple meditation like Stop, Breathe & Think to increase your focus and mitigate stress.

5. Journal before bed

If you catch yourself lying awake at night, frantically reviewing everything you have to do the next day, give journaling a try. Nancy Brook, Stanford Hospital nurse practitioner, mentor and author, recommends taking just a few minutes before bed to jot down your thoughts, experiences or concerns in a journal.

“It has been shown to decrease feelings of stress and anxiety,” Brook says. And all those little things your brain suddenly remembers at night? Write them down and dismiss them for the night. You can sleep easier knowing you don’t have to remember everything thanks to the record of reminders on your bedside table.

6. Figure out what enhances your mood

Even when you feel like you’re rocking nursing school, bad vibes from a colleague or a negative interaction can quickly ruin your mood. And since nursing is such a people-oriented field, learning what brightens your bad days will come in handy after graduation as well.

For Katz, it’s aromatherapy and her favorite tea with a splash of milk. “I used to have lavender plants in my back yard and would cut a bouquet for myself during the most stressful times in nursing school,” she explains. “The scent alone had a calming effect on me and looked beautiful in my living room.”

Figure out what your preferred mood boosters are and incorporate them into your daily life for a more optimistic (and less stressful) routine.

7. Eat well & nurture your body

Nursing school is a marathon, not a sprint. While your health and sanity might be able to endure a short period of exhaustion, caffeine and on-the-fly meals, your performance will plummet as the months add up. “The single most important thing nursing students can do is to care for themselves physically, mentally and spiritually,” Stoner says.

She says eating well is crucial, encouraging students to arrange healthy potlucks when they gather to study. If you feel too strapped for time to put a healthy dish together, think of it as part of your studies. You study for good results on your tests, and investing time in your health will also lead to good results on your tests. It will help you bring your best game, sustainably, throughout nursing school.

 

Credit: http://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/nursing/blog/7-expert-tips-to-survive-stress-get-through-nursing-school/
 

 

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